Sustainable Agriculture

Sep 16, 2017 by Juvêncio Mataria

Small Scale Farmers Find Farming Profitable at Long Last

Niassa province in northeast Mozambique in particular has the ideal makings of a robust farming community but continues to struggle with low agricultural productivity among the small-scale farmers who depend on traditional farming methods and low-yield seed varieties. These rural poor have little buffer against food insecurity.

Sep 14, 2017 by Steve Sywulka

Perma-Gardens

My colleague Faye and I were visiting the homes of people who had attended a World Renew-sponsored permaculture course earlier this year. It was a sunny day and I enjoyed seeing the hills in the distance as we drove to the village. “Great place to hike” said Faye, pointing at one of the hills. We started at one church and then made our way from house to house as each person proudly showed us what he or she had accomplished since the training event.

Aug 23, 2017 by Christina de Jong

Crops Destroyed by Fall Armyworm

Struggling families in East and Southern Africa are facing scarcity, in part due to a widespread infestation of the fall armyworm.

Jul 10, 2017 by Juvêncio Mataria

"They thought I was crazy"

In 2012, World Renew and the Canadian government began a five-year program aimed at stabilizing food production in Mozambique and four other countries. The program sought to enhance food security, stimulate sustainable economic growth, and build a community’s ability to set priorities and implement community-initiated plans. In Mozambique, World Renew collaborated with the Diocese of Niassa to address food security using “farm field schools,” where they could demonstrate and teach appropriate technologies and test new methods alongside traditional ones. Farm field schools rely on the adage “seeing is believing,” knowing that the time and effort invested will be repaid in farmers’ ready adaptation of methods they can see with their own eyes.

Jun 20, 2017 by Andrew Gwaivangmin

Improved Livelihoods through Creative Enterprise in Sierra Leone

During last year’s harvest, as other farmers grumbled about low yield, Mustapha Fofana hoped for a bumper rice harvest. Mustapha had reason to hope: last year he harvested 180 bushels! “I used to grow just enough rice for my household to eat. But now,” he says proudly, “I can keep some and sell the surplus to pay my children’s school fees, buy school supplies, pay family medical bills, and meet other household needs.”

May 18, 2017 by Leanne Geisterfer

Farmers are Changing the Story in Haiti

Earlier this year, I traveled to Leogane, Haiti and saw again how people can change their own story. I was there for the final evaluation of a three-year project. After the earthquake in 2010, World Renew worked with a series of farmers’ associations in the areas of Fond des Boudins and Palmiste a Vin. As the disaster response work wrapped up, we received funding for three more years to implement community organizing and livelihoods activities in 17 communities of those areas.

Apr 21, 2017 by Jenna Griffin

Earth Day 2017

Today, World Renew joins over one billion people around the globe in recognizing Earth Day, a celebration of the beauty and wonder of creation and a demonstration of support for environmental protection. World Renew is committed to advancing practices that improve the lives of those who are in need while protecting and nourishing the land from which we all live.

Apr 13, 2017 by Carol Musoke

Breaking New Ground

Mama Jane Wanjiko’s neighbors are raising their eyebrows. Some are even wondering if it is the work of witchcraft. Who in the middle of a severe dry spell can have such a lush, fruitful garden as Mama Jane’s? Why, she has almost tripled the yield of a usual harvest!

Apr 5, 2017 by Troy Sanon

Léogane Rural Transformation

Over the past three years, World Renew has supported the development efforts in 17 small villages on the hills of Léogane in Haiti.

Apr 4, 2017 by Andrew Gwaivangmin

Empowerment through Sustainable Agriculture and Microcredit

Before she participated in the SAFS and VSLA projects, Kadiatu’s income and that of her husband was so low that they had difficulty sending their children to school because they could not pay all of the school fees. The family could equally not afford two meals per day, and the situation always grew worse during the hunger season in July and August, when her husband had to go extra lengths to make charcoal for sale, despite the fire hazard involved. That was the only way they knew how to survive.

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